Intel RealSense

See The World In New Ways With The Intel RealSense Plugin For Unreal Engine 4

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The Intel RealSense cameras use infrared light to compute depth in addition to normal RGB pictures and video. To assist in the development of applications with this technology, Intel created the RealSense SDK, a library of computer vision algorithms including facial recognition, image segmentation, and 3D scanning.

Moving Physical Objects

Moving Physical Objects

 on | blueprints features learning programming

In 4.9 we’ve exposed the teleport flag to several blueprint nodes, and this seemed like a good opportunity to give some detail on how it all works. Check it out!

Animation Blueprints

Animation Blueprints

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"Animation Blueprint” sounds more intimidating than “Blueprint”. Blueprints were fun, but now Animation Blueprints seem to work different than Blueprints, so I wanted to talk about it here. Let's have a look at the Animation Blueprint and how it functions. 

Photoshop Generated Flow Maps

Photoshop Generated Flow Maps

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Photoshop provides a great number of tools for texture editing and photo manipulation. Conveniently, those same tools can be used to generate flow maps. This blog post will show you how flow maps can be authored within Photoshop using a UV texture and an action that Epic provides. Please note that this action only works in Photoshop CS5 and above.  

New Blueprint Character Movement Features

New Blueprint Character Movement Features

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Unreal Engine 4.2 introduces a number of new features to make character movement more flexible. It’s now even easier to implement features like ‘Hold To Jump Higher’ and Double-Jumping in Blueprints.

Shipping Tappy Chicken

Shipping Tappy Chicken

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Tappy Chicken is out now, shipped simultaneously on iOS, Android, and HTML5. Available as a free, lightweight download, it’s the first UE4 game released on any of those platforms, and one of the first overall.

Damage in UE4

Damage in UE4

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Damage support is a feature of the base Actor class, making it widely available. The system provides easy access to common functionality for quick results, while also being extensible to allow you to customize your damage model when needed. We’ve also made an effort to avoid making assumptions about how to respond to damage, meaning you won’t find any notion of “hit points” or “death” in the engine. These concepts tend to be very game-specific, and we’ve found that attempts to generalize them end up causing more pain than they prevent.

Introduction to Blueprints

Introduction to Blueprints

 on | blueprints features learning tutorials

So, for the record and as far as I’m concerned, Blueprints might just be the very best thing to come along since fresh donuts, waterslides, and movies with giant monsters and robots punching each other. They allow a programmatically challenged geek like me all the freedom I need to make my own games and gameplay systems. I think more than anything else I love them because they’re just plain fun.

Blueprint Macros and Macro Libraries

Blueprint Macros and Macro Libraries

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A Blueprint Macro lets you reuse a set of nodes over and over, and can be created in any blueprint (using the Add Macro button on the ‘My Blueprint’ toolbar). You can also turn a selection into a macro by right-clicking on a selected node and using the ‘Collapse to Macro’ option. A macro works a lot like a collapsed graph; you can define arbitrary inputs and outputs, which will show up as pins whenever you place a macro instance.  Here is an example of a macro named IsValid, which checks to see if an object pin is valid or not:

Managing complexity in Blueprints

Managing complexity in Blueprints

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As you build larger projects with Blueprints, it’s easy to end up with an overwhelming sea of nodes.  However, we’ve built in a number of different encapsulation and code reuse mechanisms to help you battle the chaos.